Data explorer


In case you do not live in New York City or you did not attend Data Gotham, do not worry because nearly all the videos and talks are posted on the Data Gotham 2013 Youtube page.

Logan Symposium: Google Public Data Explorer from Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism on

4th Annual Logan Symposium on Investigative Reporting


Uploaded on Jun 2, 2010

Complete video at:…

Using Google’s new Public Data Explorer tool, Ola Rosling demonstrates the effectiveness of visualizing datasets. Looking toward the next political election, Rosling hopes voters will use the tool to answer questions like: How was the money spent? Where are the biggest problems?


Ola Rosling of Google Public Data gives a presentation titled, “Google Public Data Explorer” at the Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism. This program was recorded on April 18, 2010.

Ola Rosling co-founded the Gapminder Foundation and led the development of Trendalyzer, a software that converts time series statistics into animated, interactive and comprehensible graphics. The aim of his work is to promote a fact-based world view through increased use and understanding of freely accessible public data.

In March 2007, Google acquired the Trendalyzer software, where Rosling and his team are now scaling up their tools and making them freely available for any individual or organization to use for analyzing and visualizing data.

4D Rubik’s cube

Published on Jun 17, 2016

This video is an introduction to the mysterious 4D Rubik’s cube. Here my main focus is on revealing some ingenious tricks that will allow you to design your own algorithms for this crazy puzzle based on what you already know about the normal Rubik’s cube.

Part 2 of this video is a hands-on introduction to the 4D Rubik’s cube simulator “Magic Cube 4D”. It is hosted on Mathologer 2:
You can download “Magic Cube 4D” for free from here:
If you are really daring/totally insane and would like to try blindsolving the 4D Rubik’s cube or any of the other puzzles included in “Magic Cube 4D”, there is a custom made Mathologer version of the program that you can download from here:…
(ctrl-d will toggle between greyed out and normal coloured pieces).

Special thanks go to Melinda Green, one of the developers of Magic Cube 4D and the person behind the Magic Cube 4D website for introducing me to the world of higher-dimensional twisty puzzles, answering my many questions about the program and putting together the custom made blindcubing version of the program.

I’ve used the following fabulous programs to generate the clips of 3D and 4D Rubik’s cubes doing their thing featured in this video:

1. CubeTwister by Werner Randelshofer

2. Magic Cube 3D by David Vanderschel

3. Magic Cube 5D by Roice Nelson…

4. Magic Puzzle Ultimate by Andrey Astrelin and, of course,

5. Magic Cube 4D itself.


Burkard Polster

Some footnotes (for experts):
1. In a scrambled normal Rubik’s Cube the permutations of edges and corners will always have the same parity, that is, either both will be odd or both even. The four algorithms that I start with (cycling 3 edges, cycling 3 corners, flipping 2 edges, twisting 2 corners) correspond to even permutations of both the edges and the corners. This means that you won’t be able to solve the normal Rubik’s cube by just using these algorithms if the parity of the edge (and corner) permutation is odd. However, on closer inspection it turns out that you can do so if that parity is even. And, if it is odd, just executing one quarter turn will turn these odd permutations into even permutations which can then be unscrambled just using those for algorithms.
2. The face piece and edge piece permutations of the 4D Rubik’s cube are connected in a similar way, that is, either both permutations are odd or both are even. This means that if you get stuck solving the face hypercubies just using the algorithms that I talk about in the video (which all correspond to even permutations of those pieces), just execute a suitable twist and you are on your way. Once the face hypercubies are solved just using our algorithms you can solve the edge hypercubies. The corner piece permutation is always even and can always be solved just using the algorithms derived in the video.